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's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question -- how old is the oldest person you know. we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us know someone well into their 90's. even though we live longer one thing that hasn't change is the official retirement age. how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all f these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation. the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. ignore the headlines. the real stories this week could be found in the fine
, this is "washington week," with gwen ifill. >> once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. >> ifill: good evening. we could not have invented this week if we tried. an iconic sporting event comes under attack after one suspect is killed and another one runs, a manhunt consumes boston, shutting down the city and its suburbs. the suspects have roots in the disputed russian province of chechnya, and in the middle of it all, the president of the united states becomes consoler in chief once again. >> they sought to intimidate us, to terterrorize us, to chaik p shake us from those values that deval described, the values that make us who we are as americans, well, it should be pretty clear by now they picked the wrong city to do it. >> ifill: the boston marathon bombings brought us back to that scary place we lived through after oklahoma city, after atlanta, and after 9/11, the sense that nothing is under control. so where do things stand tonight, tom? >> . >> still not quite under control, it seems, gwen. and i imagine for the people of boston, today must have been a day something like what 9/1
bombings manhunt. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we explore what's known about the tsarnaev brothers' lives online where they may have been inspired to mount the attacks. >> ifill: plus, jeffrey brown talks to kenneth feinberg, the man charged with overseeing the $21 million fund to compensate the wounded and the families of the ad. >> woodruff: then, we update the search for the source of poison- laced letters sent to president obama and a u.s. senator. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on the raging mississippi river floods that have inundated multiple states. >> reporter: steady downpours across the midwest have swollen streams, creeks and rivers beyond their banks. four people, in three states, have died in the floodwaters. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets two views on whether food sent overseas to help foreigners in need should be bought from u.s. farmers and shipped on u.s. vessels. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing
bombings was charged today with the use of a weapon of mass destruction. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the investigation, both in the u.s. and abroad, into the two brothers believed to be behind the blasts, as the youngest remains hospitalized in serious, but stable condition. >> ifill: and we explore the legal questions raised by trying dzhokhar tsarnaev in federal court. >> brown: then, ray suarez gets an update on guantanamo bay, where more than half the prisoners are now on a hunger strike, protesting their indefinite detentions. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of older workers starting new businesses late in life. >> if you're smart and you realize you're getting older, well then, get into a business where you leverage the younger people and eventually you become the great gray god. >> brown: and judy woodruff looks into the trial of kermit gosnell-- the philadelphia abortion doctor accused of eight counts of murder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour h
for changes to medicare and social security, plus more tax hikes for the wealthy. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get two takes on the budget proposal from white house economic adviser gene sperling and house g.o.p. conference chair cathy mcmorris rodgers. >> ifill: then, with a senate compromise on background checks breathing new life into a comprehensive guns bill, we look at gun violence in the nation's cities. >> woodruff: paul solman returns to new york city's riker's island to explore one way to keep teens from returning to jail: behavioral therapy. >> if we want to change outcomes we have to change behavior, and if we want to change behavior for the long run, we have to change the way we think. >> ifill: margaret warner looks at a billion dollar trove of picasso and other important cubist works, given by one man to the metropolitan museum of art. >> woodruff: and we close with a cuban activist's reflections on freedom, oppression and life as a dissident in her home country. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour.
for the wealthy. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get two takes on the budget proposal from white house economic adviser gene sperling and house g.o.p. conference chair cathy mcmorris rodgers. >> ifill: then, with a senate compromise on background checks breathing new life into a comprehensive guns bill, we look at gun violence in the nation's cities. >> woodruff: paul solman returns to new york city's riker's island to explore one way to keep teens from returning to jail: behavioral therapy. >> if we want to change outcomes we have to change behavior, and if we want to change behavior for the long run, we have to change the way we think. >> ifill: margaret warner looks at a billion dollar trove of picasso and other important cubist works, given by one man to the metropolitan museum of art. >> woodruff: and we close with a cuban activist's reflections on freedom, oppression and life as a dissident in her home country. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪
'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation, and the condition of dzhokar tsarnaev, upgraded today to fair. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown examines the lessons learned for public safety officials about security at big events and gatherings. >> ifill: then, a powerful democrat, montana's max baucus, is the eighth senator to say he won't seek reelection next year. we look at why democrats are worried. >> woodruff: fred de sam lazaro reports on gender bias in india, where many parents still opt for baby boys over girls. >> the gap began to wideen in the '90s with new ultrasound machines that made it easy to learn a fetus's sex. this scans have led to the termination of millions of female pregnancies. >> ifill: and margaret warner talks with the author of a new book about shadow warfare waged by the c.i.a. and special forces. >> a week after 9/11 president bush gave the c.i.a. lethal authority to capture and kill al qaeda members so they become much more into the killing business and the military. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour
once again live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. just when it seemed the economy was on a reliable upturn and jobs were returning for good comes unsettling news today. instead of the 200,000 new jobs economists predicted for the month of march only 88,000 were add. and even though the unemployment rate dropped to 7.6% that is because some people have given up look for work. so why are things so unstable in the economy? david? >> it was an unambiguous jobs report at least until the government revises it. new jobs were created at half the pace. and the unemployment rate fell only because half a million people left the labor force. and the reason it was so disturbing was that it comes at a time when the other economic data was looking pretty good. auto sales is going up, housing. the stock market had a bad week this week but it's grown 10% this year. i guess the question is -- what happened? what went wrong? one is there is the revision question. in 10 of the last 14 months the government has revised up its initial estimate. gwen: so it looks better than
week with gwen ifill." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question. how old is the oldest person you've known? >> we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who lived well into their 90's and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed, the official retirement age. the question is, how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it's been a puzzling week with more questions than answers on crime, punishment, war, and politics. we start with the investigation into the boston bombings. dzhokhar tsarnaev is in prison tonight held as the prime surviving suspect in last week's att
control advocates. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get reaction to today's vote and what it means for the future of gun legislation. >> ifill: then, conflicting reports caused confusion over the status of the investigation into the boston bombings. we have the latest on what's known and what's not. >> brown: letters sent to the president and members of congress were believed to contain the poison, ricin. todd zwillich of wnyc reports on the suspicious packages. >> ifill: and britain's first female prime minister is buried. in london, thousands turn out to wish margaret thatcher a fond farewell, others to bid her good riddance. >> brown: marcia coyle has analysis of today's unanimous ruling from the supreme court that blocks human rights cases abroad from being tried in the u.s. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks to the author of the new book "clean," about his deep dive into the myths and realities of drug addiction. >> it's seen as a choice: "if you're having problems in your life because you're using drugs or you're drin
of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: and we pick up on some of the legal questions being asked about the criminal case against against dzhokhar tsarnaev. if tsarnyev is found guilty as charged of using a weapon of mass destruction, he could face the death penalty. but what else does he, and should he face? for that, we turn to, david rivkin, who served in the justice department in the reagan and bush administrations. and laura murphy, director of the washington legislative office for the american civil liberties union. david rivkin, start by explaining to us what this means. using a weapon of mass destruction. is it a term of legal art? >> it is a term of art, gwen. good to be with you. it is obviously a manifestation of the seriousness of the attack. it is a charge that carries a death penalty, and i for one, given the wealth of physical evidence and evidence that the prosecution will be able to bring to bear, would be quite comfortable predicting that he would be convicted and sentenced appropriately. >> ifill: laura murphy, that term "weapon of mass destruction," is th
who helped transform cold war politics, has died. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we remember the "iron lady" in three parts. first, her impact as britain's first female prime minister. >> ifill: then we revisit a 1981 then we revis it a 1981 interview with thatcher and our own robert macneil and jim leer. >> woodruff: and we examine her legacy with two former u.s. secretaries of state, james baker, and george shultz. and former canadian prime minister tim campbell. >> ifill: as congress grapples with gun legislation we look at several states' efforts to pass gun law of of their own. >> woodruff: with close with another legacy of the cold war with reports from germ answer on new efforts to protect what remains of the berlin wall. >> attitudes toward the wall have shifted in the last two decades. now many germans want to preserve it. so the mistakes of the past won't be repeated. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight'
. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we debate whether the u.s. should intervene and explore who the fighters are behind the rebellion. >> ifill: then, taxing the internet. we discuss how congress may be changing the way we pay for the things we buy. >> woodruff: basketball's jason collins becomes the first male pro athlete still playing one of the big four sports to come out and say he's gay. we assess what his announcement means for sexual stereotypes on and off the court. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on today's gathering of holocaust survivors and the veterans who helped save them, to mark the 20th anniversary of the u.s. holocaust memorial museum. >> woodruff: our "daily download" looks at the bogus tweet last week that sent the financial markets into a minutes-long nosedive. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan explores "pandora's lunchbox" with the author of a new book on processed foods. >> technology has merged with food production in a way that few of us, i think realize, but i the way our bodies procession food, it's stuck somewhere in the
'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have our own debate on the latest legislative sticking point: expanding background checks on gun sales. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey brown talks to a film producer who went "behind the lines" of the syrian conflict, the topic of tonight's "frontline." >> everyday i was witnessing bloodshed. i was either seeing people get killed or i was seeing the aftermath of people being killed or i was seeing people being buried. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of a new way to invest, as goldman sachs partners with the city of new york to keep teenagers from returning to prison. >> we believe that we will make 5% on this. and we're not doing it to be charitable, we're doing it because it's an investment. >> woodruff: and as funeral arrangements are set for former prime minister margaret thatcher, we assess the divisive policies of the "iron lady." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> more than two years ago, the people of b.p. made a commitment to the gulf. and every day since, we've worked
much. >> thank you, gwen. >> ifill: for the view from the white house i spoke with gene sperling, director of the president's economic council. gene sperling, thank you for joining us, the president said today in the rose garden what he was proposing is not optimal, is the word he used, but he needed to go this far for compromise. so far, both sides seem to be rejecting this. well, the president rightly said that he was putting forward today something that was unquestionably a compromise offer to speaker boehner to try to get a balanced deficit reduction package that would get us out of this very harmful sequester, deal with some of our long-term fiscal challenges, and put us on a path to both lowering our deficit, but also still investing in jobs right now, by accelerating infrastructure investmentes, and investing in our long-term competitiveness. and the president said all along that we're not going to get that type of a compromise unless everybody is willing to give a little. no one is going to get 100%. and the president's very clear-- this is not his ideal proposal but it s
's history. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation into who was behind the attack, which president obama now calls a "terrorist act." >> brown: three people were killed and more than 150 were injured, many critically. hari sreenivasan talks with a trauma doctor who led a team that treated the wounded. >> one of our trauma surgeons ran the marathon and when he finied realized what was happening and came in to operate on some of the patients. >> ifill: and the daily download team looks at social media's role in spreading tragic as well as healing messages. >> brown: then, the supreme court takes up a child custody case that tests the scope of a federal law intended to protect native american families. marcia coyle recaps today's arguments. >> ifill: and a new bipartisan report finds that after 9/11, the u.s. "engaged in the practice of torture" with detainees. we talk with two of the authors. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: movi
and his brother acted alone. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation, and the condition of dzhokar tsarnaev, upgraded today to fair. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown examines the lessons learned for public safety officials about security at big events and gatherings. >> ifill: then, a powerful democratmontana's max baucus, is the eighth senator to say he won't seek reelection next year. we look at why democrats are worried. >> woodruff: fred de sam lazaro reports on gender bias in india, where many parents still opt for baby boys over girls. >> the gap began to wideen in the '90s with new ultrasound machines that made it easy to learn a fetus's sex. this scans have led to the termination of millions of female pregnancies. >> ifill: and margaret warner talks with the author of a new book about shadow wfa waged bythe c.i.a. and speal forces. >> a week after 9/11 president bush gave the c.i.a. lethal authority to capture and kill al qaeda members so they become much more into the killing bus
hundreds of south korean workers from a factory complex on the border. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we examine the strategic and economic significance of the shutdown and the heightened tensions. >> ifill: then, we get two views about the safety of oil pipelines, after a rupture in arkansas last week forced the evacuation of more than 20 homes. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown examines the impact of across- the-board federal spending cuts on scientific research. >> ifill: john merrow reports on a kentucky school district that's spending less time testing students and more time on projects like building rockets. >> are they learning? yes. i feel like they're probably learning more than they ever would just sitting there hearing me tell them about a certain section of textbook. >> woodruff: we get the latest on an arizona man freed from prison after 42 years, when new evidence surfaced about his murder conviction. >> ifill: and we close with the story of a theater group that brings shakespeare's classics into schools, as a way
, dealing a blow to the white house and to gun control advocates. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get reaction to today's vote and what it means for the future of gun legislation. >> ifill: then, conflicting reports caused confusion over the status of the investigation into the boston bombings. we have the latest on what's known and what's not. >> brown: letters sent to the president and members of congress were believed to contain the poison, ricin. todd zwillich of wnyc reports on the suspicious packages. >> ifill: and britain's first female prime minister is buried. in london, thousands turn out to wish margaret thatcher a fond farewell, others to bid her good riddance. >> brown: marcia coyle has analysis of today's unanimous ruling from the supreme court that blocks human rights cases abroad from being tried in the u.s. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks to the author of the new book "clean," about his deep dive into the myths and realities of drug addiction. >> it's seen as a choice: "if you're having problems in your life
transform cold war politics, has died. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we remember the "iron lady" in three parts. first, her impact as britain's first female prime minister. >> ifill: then we revisit a 1981 then we revis it a 1981 interview with thatcher and our own robert macneil and jim leer. >> woodruff: and we examine her legacy with two former u.s. secretaries of state, james baker, and george shultz. and former canadian prime minister tim campbell. >> ifill: as congress grapples with gun legislation we look at several states' efforts to pass gun laws of of their own. >> woodruff: with close with another legacy of the cold war with reports from germ answer on new efforts to protect what remains of the berlin wall. >> attitudes toward the wall have shifted in the last two decades. now many germans want to preserve it. so the mistakes of the past won't be repeated. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >>
of damascus. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we debate whether the u.s. should intervene and explore who the fighters are behind the rebellion. >> ifill: then, taxing the internet. we discuss how congress may be changing the way we pay for the things we buy. >> woodruff: basketball's jason collins becomes the first male pro athlete still playing one of the big four sports to come out and say he's gay. we assess what his announcement means for sexual stereotypes on and off the court. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on
attempt in the heart of damascus. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm jud woodrf. on the newshour tonight, we debate whether the u.s. should intervene and explore who the fighters are behind the rebellion. >> ifill: then, taxing the internet. we discuss how congress may be changing the way we pay for the things we buy.
. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have our own debate on the latest legislative sticking point: expanding background checks on gun sales. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey brown talks to a film producer who went "behind the lines" of the syrian conflict, the topic of tonight's "frontline." >> everyday i was witnessing bloodshed. i was either seeing people get killed or i was seeing the aftermath of people being killed or i was seeing people being buried. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of a new way to invest, as goldman sachs partners with the city of new york to keep teenagers from returning to prison. >> we believe that we will make 5% on this. and we're not doing it to be charitable, we're doing it because it's an investment. >> woodruff: and as funeral arrangements are set for former prime minister margaret thatcher, we assess the divisive policies of the "iron lady." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> more than two years ago, the people of b.p. made a commitment to the gulf. and every day since
marathon, turning the festive scene into one of carnage and chaos. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. tackles science, research and genetics in a case that could determine who controls your medical care. marcia coyle recaps today's court arguments as the legal world asks, can a gene be patented. >> brown: we get an update on the senate's move toward bipartisan immigration reform with republican senator marco rubio leading the charge this weekend. >> ifill: ray suarez looks at venezuela's contentious presidential election as the opponent asks for a recount. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation into who was behind the attack, which president obama now calls a "terrorist act." >> brown: three people were killed and more than 150 were injured, many critically. hari sreenivasan talks with a trauma doctor who led a team that treated the wounded. >> one of our trauma surgeons ran the marathon and when he finished realized what was happening and came in to operate on some of the patients. >> ifill: and the daily download team looks at social media's role in spreading tragic as well as healing messages. >> brown: then, the supreme court takes up a child custody case that tests the scope of a federal law intended to protect native american families. marcia coyle recaps today's arguments. >> ifill: and a new bipartisan report finds that after 9/11, the u.s. "engaged in the practice of torture" with detainees. we talk with two of the authors. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: mo
of mass destruction. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the investigation, both in the u.s. and abroad, into the two brothers believed to be behind the blasts, as the youngest remains hospitalized in serious, but stable condition. >> ifill: and we explore the legal questions raised by trying dzhokhar tsarnaev in federal court. >> brown: then, ray suarez gets an update on guantanamo bay, where more than half the prisoners are now on a hunger strike, protesting their indefinite detentions. >> ifill: paul solman has the story of older workers starting new businesses late in life. >> if you're smart and you realize you're getting older, well then, get into a business where you leverage the younger people and eventually you become the great gray god. >> brown: and judy woodruff looks into the trial of kermit gosnell-- the philadelphia abortion doctor accused of eight counts of murder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy fo
political clout with congress. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we examine the president's renewed pledge to close the guantanamo detention facility once and for all. >> woodruff: plus, we look at the relationship between the white house and congress, and what that means for spending cuts, immigration, and more. >> ifill: then, we update the investigation into the boston bombings with the latest information on whether the two suspects had help. >> woodruff: betty ann bowser reports on the perils of prescription drug abuse and the challenges of combating it.
" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here, to chart a greener path in the air nd in our factories. >> to find cleaner more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
of the boston marathon, turning the festive scene into one of carnage and chaos. good evening. i'm gwen ifill.
.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, we'll bring you the prayer service for the victims in boston. i'm gwen ifill >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. thank you for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)